What does a dog howling mean? Should I Be Worried About My Dog’s Howling?

What does a dog howling mean? Should I Be Worried About My Dog’s Howling?

Why Do Dogs Howl? Should I Be Concerned?

The mysterious and haunting sound of a dog howling has captivated humans for centuries. Many dog parents have found themselves wondering about this behavior and in some cases asking if they should be worried about their dog howling. This intriguing behavior always leads to questions like: Why do dogs howl? Should I be worried about my dog howling? Is your dog trying to tell you something through their howl? Are there different kinds of howling? What can I do if my dog is howling too much?

Let’s unpack all these question one by one by starting from the first origins. 

Why Do Wolves Howl?

To understand why dogs howl, we need to go back to their roots, tracing their ancestry to wolves. Wolves, the ancestors of domestic dogs, rely on howling as a form of communication. This instinctual way of vocal communication serves various purposes in the wild, including marking territory, recalling the pack, and signaling danger or the location of prey. Wolves howl to maintain social bonds within the pack and convey crucial information across long distances.

Why Do Dogs Howl?

Some domestic dogs, having evolved from wolves, have inherit this howling behavior with some modifications. While domestic family dogs don’t need or depend on howling as wolves do in the  wilderness, dogs can howl for various reasons. It’s a form of communication manifested in different ways that can send different messages depending on the context. We’ll talk later in this article how dogs use howling as a form of social interaction and what different types of howls might mean.

Reasons Dogs Howl

Before we drive into potential concerns and solutions related to dog howling, let’s talk about the various reasons why dogs howl. This will lay the groundwork for understanding their vocal behavior and provide insights into their communication methods.

-Dogs Howl to Get Attention

One common reason for a dog’s howling is a desire for attention. Whether they’re seeking interaction, playtime, or simply want to be acknowledged, howling is simply a way to get your valued attention. 

-Dogs Howl to Communicate with People or Other Dogs

Dogs are social animals, and howling is one way they communicate with both humans and fellow dogs. We’ll talk later in this article how dogs use howling as a form of social interaction and what different types of howls might mean.

-Dogs Howl to Let Others Know They’re There

In the wild, wolves use howling to establish their presence and maintain contact with other pack members. Human family dogs, may howl to tell their location or their presence to other dogs in your neighborhood. This is why sometimes this behavior can become a block doggy howling concert!

-Dogs Howl to Express Emotions

Sometime dogs howl to express their emotions. This could be joy, loneliness, anxiety – each emotion can have its unique nuanced sound. 

-Dogs Howl to Convey Pain or Discomfort

Howling can also express physical distress. I’ll explain later how to differentiate between attention-seeking howls and those that signal pain or discomfort.

-Dogs Howl to Respond to Triggering Noises

Certain sounds can trigger a dog’s howling instinct. Whether it’s a siren, musical instruments, or other dogs howling, sometimes its just a conditional response to external stimuli.

-Do Dogs Howl as signaling Death?

The notion that dogs howl as an omen of death has persisted for centuries. It’s hard to separate fact from fiction, but it would be interesting to explore the cultural and historical context of this belief. Let me know on the comments if you’d like to know more about that! 

Should I Be Worried About My Dog’s Howling?

While occasional howling is normal, persistent or sudden changes in behavior may be concerning. Excessive howling could 

indicate underlying issues, and understanding when to be worried is crucial for your dog’s well-being.

Excessive howling may be a sign of distress, boredom, loneliness, or even a medical problem. Dogs are highly expressive creatures, and changes in behavior are often their way of communicating that something is up.

If your dog has suddenly started howling more than usual, consider factors such as recent changes in their environment, routine, or any potential stressors. Environmental factors, like loud noises or the presence of unfamiliar people or animals, can trigger increased vocalization.

What’s the difference between attention-seeking howls and pain or discomfort howls?

Distinguishing between attention-seeking howls and those that indicate pain or discomfort in your dog requires careful observation and understanding of your dog’s behavior. Here are some tips to help you differentiate:

Context and Timing:

Pay attention to when the howling occurs. If your dog howls when you’re not giving attention or during specific situations, it may be attention-seeking. On the other hand, if it happens consistently during certain activities or when touched in a specific area, it could be a sign of pain.

Body Language:

Observe your dog’s overall body language. Signs of pain may include a tense body, hunched back, or avoidance of certain movements. Attention-seeking howls may be accompanied by playful behavior or a wagging tail. Don’t underestimate your intuition. Intuition tends to flow in when you are a good observer just by paying attention. 

Location of Howling:

Consider where your dog is howling. If it happens when you leave the room or when they want your attention, it’s likely attention-seeking. If the howling is associated with a specific area or while performing certain actions, it may indicate discomfort or pain.

Vocalization Nuances:

The tone and pitch of the howl can provide clues. Continuous and high-pitched howls may indicate distress or pain, while short, sporadic howls may be attention-seeking.

Physical Examination:

Gently examine your dog for any signs of injury or discomfort. Check for limping, swelling, or sensitivity in certain areas. If you suspect pain, consult with a veterinarian for a thorough examination.

Changes in Behavior:

Pay attention for any changes in your dog’s behavior. If you feel their not acting as themselves. If they suddenly become more aggressive, reluctant to engage in activities they usually enjoy, or  they seem less energetic it could be a sign of pain.

Consulting a Veterinarian:

If you’re uncertain about the cause of your dog’s howling, it’s always a good idea to consult with a veterinarian. They can perform a physical examination, conduct tests if necessary, and provide professional advice on your dog’s well-being.

What Do I Do If My Dog Is Howling Too Much?

As I already covered Identifying the root cause of your dog’s increased howling is the first step in addressing the issue. Here are some practical tips to help you manage and reduce excessive howling:

1. Environmental Calmness

Ensure your dog has a relaxed environment and that feels safe at your home. Providing a home where your dog is not stress can have a great impact on their demeanor and good mental heath.

2. Regular Structured Exercise

A tired dog is less likely to engage in excessive howling. Make sure your dog gets regular structured exercise through walks, playtime, behavior training and other physical activities that involves mental self control. 

3. Vet Check-Up

If your dog’s howling is sudden or seems unrelated to environmental factors, a visit to the veterinarian is essential. Physical discomfort, pain, or underlying health issues could be triggering the increased vocalization.

4. Calm Reinforcement

Use calm reinforcement techniques for quiet behavior. When your dog refrains from howling in situations where they usually would, praise with calmness or engage your dog in a structured game that involves mental control. Be very careful with treats or activities that can overstimulate your dog, since this can trigger excitement which will trigger howling. Sometimes less is more!! For more on that read this other blog: How to calm your dog down

5. Training and Desensitization

If your dog’s howling is triggered by specific noises, consider behavior training and desensitization techniques. Gradually expose them to the triggering sounds under threshold and at low intensity. Asking for professional help from an experienced behavior trainer like Pawmos Dog Training can help if you’re not sure how to do it yourself. You can also read this bog for more insight : How to deal with a traumatic experience: Lassie is terrified of stairs

6. Seek Professional Help

If the problem persists or if you’re unsure about the underlying cause, consult with a professional dog trainer or behaviorist like Pawmos Dog Training. They can assess your dog’s behavior, provide tailored advice, and assist in developing a behavior modification plan.

Remember, patience and consistency are key when addressing excessive howling. Each dog is unique, and finding the right approach may take time.

The Musicality of Dog’s Howls

Now that we’ve addressed concerns related to excessive howling, let’s explore the musicality of doggy howls. As a former professional musician, as an artist and as behaviorist I just need to dive into this!! 

Each dog has a unique voice, and their howls can vary in pitch, tone, and duration. Now we are going to get into the different musical qualities of dog’s howls and what they might reveal about your dog’s personality.

The Art of Interpretation: Decoding Your Dog’s Howls

Have you ever wondered what your dog is trying to say through their howls? This is my favorite part! You’d be amazed of how much you can bond with your dog if you just listen. Because bonding is not just about doing things all the time, it’s also about being present and learning about your dog in silence. By listening with curiosity you can feed your own understanding and intuition directly from your dog. 

 I can’t wait to get into this. Ok, so whether it’s a mournful howl, an excited yodel, or a series of short barks, let’s decode the furry secrets within their melodic performances!

Dogs’ howls can vary in musical qualities, and while it’s not a precise science, that’s why I call it the Art of Dog Training, certain characteristics may provide insights into your dog’s personality. Keep in mind that like any art form, individual differences and contexts play a significant role, and these interpretations are simply guidelines:

Pitch:

  • High-Pitched: Excitement, playfulness, or seeking attention.
  • Low-Pitched: Confidence, assertiveness, or a response to a perceived threa

Duration:

  • Short and Sporadic: Attention-seeking, wanting to play, or expressing happiness.
  • Long and Continuous: Could indicate loneliness, anxiety, or a response to a perceived danger.

Volume:

  • Loud: Confidence, excitement, or an attempt to communicate over a distance.
  • Soft: Submission, fear, or a less urgent form of communication.

Consistency:

  • Consistent Howling: May indicate a more stable and content personality.
  • Inconsistent or Sudden Changes: Could suggest stress, discomfort, or a reaction to a change in environment.

Harmonics:

  • ls with Vibrato or Changes in Pitch: Could indicate a more expressive and emotionally responsive personality.

Rhythm:

  • Regular Rhythm: Potential confidence and comfort.
  • Irregular Rhythm: Nervousness, fear, or uncertainty.

Context:

  • Howling in Response to Certain Sounds: May suggest alertness or a more sensitive nature.
  • Howling during Play: Playful and social personality.
  • Howling at Strangers: Protective or territorial nature.

Solo or Group Howling:

  • Solo Howling: Independence or a desire for attention.
  • Group Howling: Social and pack-oriented nature.

Frequency:

  • Frequent Howling: Could indicate a more vocal and expressive personality.
  • Rare Howling: Reserved or less vocal personality.

Reactivity:

  • Quick Response to Environmental Stimuli: Alertness and awareness.
  • Delayed or Lack of Response: Could suggest a more laid-back or indifferent personality.

 

To sum up the howl remains one of the most enigmatic aspects of dog’s behavior. Rooted in their ancestral ties to wolves, dogs’ howling serves various functions in their communication repertoire. Understanding the reasons behind your dog’s howling can deepen the bond between you and your furry friend. So, the next time you hear that haunting melody, remember – it’s your dog’s unique way of expressing themselves in the language of howls.

         © Gabriel Riesco, Pawmos Dog Training LLC |   All Rights Reserved Jan 2024

Why Do Dogs Bury Bones? You’d Be Surprised

Why Do Dogs Bury Bones? You’d Be Surprised

Dogs never cease to amaze us with their fascinating behaviors. Among these actions, the act of burying bones has captivated dog parents for generations. Have you ever found yourself wondering why your pup diligently digs a hole in the backyard or carefully stashes their prized possessions in the garden? Let’s go over the secrets behind this instinctive dog behavior, tracing its roots back to the wild ancestors of our beloved pups.

1. Why They Do It: Instincts from the Wild

Understanding this behavior takes us into little evolutionary journey. Domestic dogs share a common ancestry with wolves, and the practice of burying bones can be traced back to their wild instincts. In the wild, wolves buried surplus food to shield it from scavengers and create reserves for leaner times. This survival instinct has been passed down through generations, with specific breeds, such as Basset Hounds, Dachshunds, and Terriers, displaying a heightened inclination to bury toys and food due to their historical roles in digging for underground prey.

Moreover, dogs exhibit a hoarding mentality, a reflection of their pack instincts. Burying bones becomes a way for them to secure resources within their family “pack,” even if that pack comprises their human companions. Scent marking, another layer of this behavior, allows dogs to leave their mark on buried treasures, creating a connection through their acute sense of smell. In essence, your dog may be engaging in a complex dance of survival instincts and pack behavior when burying bones.

Additionally, dogs might resort to burying bones as a stress-relief mechanism during times of change, excitement, or anxiety. Just as humans save leftovers for later, dogs may bury bones for a future, more suitable time to enjoy their tasty treats.

2. When You Should Be Concerned

Now that we’ve uncover the mystery behind why dogs bury bones, let’s get into effective strategies to manage this behavior, especially when it seems like your garden is transforming into a doggy excavation site. The concept of resource abundance plays a crucial role here. Mimicking the natural ebb and flow of resources in the wild can help curb excessive burying tendencies.

Instead of giving more toys to keep them busy, limit the number of toys or bones available to your dog at any given time, providing just one or two and rotating them weekly. This not only prevents an overflow of resources but also stimulates your dog’s curiosity, preventing boredom. Timing is also crucial; avoid giving your dog a bone immediately after a meal when their stomach is full, as they are more likely to bury bones when resources are in surplus. Engaging in interactive play fosters a stronger bond and reinforces the idea that resources are shared, discouraging hoarding behavior.

Consider the breed-specific tendencies related to digging. Breeds originally bred for digging may display more confidence in burying behavior. Understanding these breed nuances can further aid in managing your dog’s natural instincts.

3. What to Do About It: Should You Worry?

While burying things is a natural and instinctive behavior, considering potential concerns and taking proactive measures is essential for a harmonious household.

Potential Concerns:

a. Paw and Nail Injuries: Digging in areas with a rigid substrate can lead to abrasions and discomfort for your furry friend.

b. Indoor Damages: Burying behavior may extend indoors, resulting in damage to items like pet beds and couch cushions.

c. Stress for Both: Constant worry about belongings and disapproval can create stress for both pet parents and their dogs.

What to Do:

a. Do NOT Create a Designated Digging Area: Do NOT redirect your dog’s instincts by providing a designated digging spot in your backyard filled with loose soil or sand if you don’t want to encourage that behavior or if your dog starts obsessing about it. 

b. Understanding Breed-Specific Behavior: Recognize that certain breeds are more inclined to bury items and tailor your approach accordingly. 

c. Work the breed out: If your dog’s breed encourages this behavior and you have a family dog, work on behavior training to start working the obsessive side of the breed out of your dog.. Certain breeds are prone to obsessions. Have in mind that breed was created by humans not by nature

d. Implement Behavior Training: Help your dog regulate compulsive behaviors by teaching self control and self management.

e. Supervision and Management: Keep an eye on your dog, intervening when needed and reinforcing boundaries. 

In conclusion the mystery behind why dogs bury bones lies in their deep-rooted instincts inherited from their wild ancestors.

While this behavior is natural and instinctive, it’s crucial for pet parents to be aware of potential concerns and take proactive measures for a harmonious household. Paw and nail injuries, indoor damages, and stress for both the pet and owner are important factors to take into considerations. Managing this behavior involves a thoughtful approach, considering breed-specific tendencies, resource abundance, interactive play and behavior training if needed.

Effective strategies, such as limiting the number of toys, understanding breed nuances, and engaging in behavior training, can help strike a good balance.

© Gabriel Riesco, Pawmos Dog Training LLC |   All Rights Reserved Dec 2023

Why Do Dogs Eat Grass? Understanding Your Dog’s Craving

Why Do Dogs Eat Grass? Understanding Your Dog’s Craving

Dog parents like me have likely observed their pups grazing on grass at some point, leaving many to wonder why dogs engage in this behavior. While it may seem peculiar, dogs eating grass is a common behavior, and researchers and veterinarians have proposed several explanations for this quirky habit.

Reasons Why Dogs Eat Grass:

  • Digestive Aid:  One theory suggests that dogs eat grass as a means to induce vomiting. In the wild, dogs may consume plant material to help purge indigestible matter from their stomachs. Grass, with its fibrous texture, may act as an irritant and trigger vomiting, in order to remove unwanted substances.
  • Nutritional Deficiency:  Some experts propose that dogs may eat grass due to nutritional deficiencies in their diets. If a dog lacks certain vitamins  or minerals, they might instinctively seek out alternative sources in the form of vegetation. However, it’s crucial to note that modern dog diets are carefully formulated to meet nutritional requirements, making this explanation less likely.
  • Instinctual Behavior:  Eating grass could be an instinctual behavior inherited from the dog’s wild ancestors. Wolves and other wild canines have been observed eating plants.  This behavior may have been carried on to domesticated dogs.

  • Boredom or Anxiety: Dogs, like humans, can resort to certain behaviors out of boredom or anxiety. If a dog is left alone for extended periods of time and lacks mental control, it may turn to eating grass as a form of entertainment or self-soothing.

  • Taste and Texture: Some dogs simply enjoy the taste or texture of grass. Dogs use their mouths to explore the world, and the different textures of grass may be appealing to them. This is especially true for puppies, who are known to explore the world through mouthing.

  • Natural Laxative: Grass contains a significant amount of fiber, and ingesting it may act as a natural laxative for dogs. In some cases, dogs may consume grass to help alleviate constipation or other digestive issues.

Is Eating Grass Bad for Dogs?

The act of eating grass itself is not inherently harmful to dogs. In fact, many dogs consume grass without experiencing any adverse effects. However, there are concerns about the potential ingestion of pesticides or chemicals present on the grass, which could be harmful to dogs.

Effects of Eating Grass on Dogs:

While most dogs can tolerate eating grass without consequences, there is a risk of gastrointestinal upset if the grass is treated with chemicals. Signs of distress may include vomiting, diarrhea, or lethargy.

How Can I Stop My Dog from Eating Grass?

If you’re concerned about your dog’s grass-eating habits, consider these strategies:

  • Ensure a Balanced Diet: Make sure your dog is on a well-balanced diet to address any potential nutritional deficiencies.

  • Provide Mental and Physical structured activities : Engage your dog in regular structured activities where he or she has to practice self control. This way your dog will be tired and  content instead of getting restless, bored and anxiuos. Note that unstructured games or activities can lead to restlessness and more anxiety. 

  • Choose Safe Grass Areas: If your dog enjoys grazing, ensure they do so in areas free of pesticides or harmful chemicals.

Is Eating Grass Instinctual or a Psychological/Physical Need?

While the exact reason dogs eat grass remains a subject of debate, it likely involves a combination of instinctual behavior, exploration, and potential physical or psychological needs. Dogs may eat grass for various reasons, and the motivation behind this behavior can vary from one individual to another.

When Should I Call the Vet?

If your dog exhibits signs of distress such as persistent vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, or if you suspect they have ingested toxic substances from the grass, it’s crucial to contact your veterinarian promptly. A professional can assess the situation and provide appropriate guidance based on your dog’s specific circumstances.

While grass consumption is a common behavior in dogs, understanding the underlying reasons can help pet owners make informed decisions about their dog’s well-being. Monitoring the environment, ensuring a balanced diet, and seeking veterinary advice when necessary are key components of responsible dog ownership.

© Gabriel Riesco, Pawmos Dog Training LLC |   All Rights Reserved December 2023

Is Sleeping with Your Dog a Good Idea?    Navigating the Debate on Sharing Your Bed with Your Dog

Is Sleeping with Your Dog a Good Idea? Navigating the Debate on Sharing Your Bed with Your Dog

As the sun sets and the day winds down, many dog parents face a nightly dilemma – to invite their four-legged companions into the bed or not. The discussion surrounding co-sleeping with dogs has evolved into a nuanced debate, with pet parents weighing the pros and cons of this age-old practice.questions like: Is it good for my dog to sleep in my bed? Is it good for my kids to sleep with our pup? Is it good for me? 

In this discussion, we’ll dissect the intricacies of sleeping with your pup, considering the health implications for both humans and dogs, evaluating the potential benefits and drawbacks, and examining scenarios where co-sleeping might not be a good idea.

Is it Healthy for Me to Sleep with My Dog?

The emotional bond between humans and their dogs is undeniable, and for many, the idea of sharing a bed is a testament to that connection. Research suggests that having a pet in the bedroom, particularly a dog, can positively impact sleep quality. The companionship and sense of security provided by a canine bedmate can reduce stress and anxiety, promoting a more restful night’s sleep.

Nevertheless, the debate persists as some argue that co-sleeping with dogs may lead to disturbances in sleep patterns. Dogs, creatures of routine, may wake up during the night or shift around, potentially disrupting their owner’s sleep. Additionally, concerns about allergies arise, as dogs can introduce allergens into the bed, which may affect individuals with allergies or asthma.

Is it Healthy for Dogs to Sleep in Our Beds?

Dogs, being descendants of pack animals, often crave closeness with their human family members. The practice of sleeping in close proximity can deepen the bond between pets and their owners. However, considerations such as the size and breed of the dog become crucial factors. Larger dogs might occupy more space, potentially causing discomfort for both the dog and their human bedmate. Striking a balance between companionship and the dog’s need for undisturbed sleep is paramount.

Pros and Cons for Humans:

Pros:

  • Comfort and Companionship: The warmth and presence of a dog can provide a sense of comfort and companionship.
  • Stress Reduction: Studies have linked the presence of a dog to reduced stress levels and improved mental well-being.
  • Warmth: Dogs’ body heat contributes to a cozy sleeping environment, especially during colder nights.

Cons:

  • Disturbed Sleep: Dogs may move around or wake up during the night, potentially disrupting the owner’s sleep.
  • Allergies: Allergens from dogs, such as dander, may be a concern for individuals with allergies or asthma.
  • Space Issues: Larger dogs may take up a significant portion of the bed, leading to discomfort for the owner.

Pros and Cons for Dogs:

Pros:

  • Bonding: Co-sleeping can strengthen the emotional bond between dogs and their owners.
  • Comfort: Dogs often find solace in being close to their human companions.
  • Security: Sleeping with their owners can make dogs feel more secure and reduce anxiety.

Cons:

  • Space Constraints: Dogs may have limited space to move around, affecting their comfort.
  • Disrupted Sleep: Human movements or restless sleepers can disturb a dog’s sleep.
  • Allergens: Dogs may be exposed to allergens present in the human bed, affecting their health.

Some of Us Should not sleep with our dogs

While the benefits of co-sleeping with dogs are evident, certain situations call for caution or abstaining from this practice.

Breathing Issues:

Individuals with respiratory conditions, such as sleep apnea or snoring, may find that a dog’s presence exacerbates these issues. In such cases, maintaining a separate sleeping space for the dog is advisable to ensure the owner’s respiratory health.

Some Dogs with Behavioral Issues Should Not Join the Family Bed:

Co-sleeping with dogs can be a delightful experience, fostering a sense of companionship and warmth. However, the decision to welcome your canine companion into your bed should be guided by considerations that go beyond mere comfort. One crucial factor to assess is the behavior of the dog, as it can significantly impact the co-sleeping dynamic.

For starters, Dogs with behavioral problems, such as aggression or possessiveness, may not be suitable bedmates. Co-sleeping can reinforce dominant behavior in some dogs, potentially leading to conflicts and safety concerns. On top[ of that some dogs will bite when they get startled or woken up from a deep sleep without any warning. 

Puppies, despite their undeniable cuteness, might not be the ideal bedfellows in the initial stages of their development. While they undoubtedly crave the warmth and security of being close to their human family, allowing them into the bed too early might contribute to the development of separation anxiety. Puppies, like human infants, need to learn independence and establish a routine that includes periods of separation to avoid potential attachment issues. A separate sleeping area, perhaps a cozy crate, can provide them with a secure space while still being close to their human companions.

Beyond the realm of puppyhood, certain dogs may exhibit behavioral issues that make co-sleeping less than ideal. Dogs with anxiety or separation anxiety issues, for instance, might not thrive in the family bed environment. While the instinct to seek comfort from their owners is strong, dogs with anxiety-related challenges may benefit from a structured routine that includes crate training. A well-designed crate can become a safe haven, offering a retreat for the dog to cope with their anxiety and establish a sense of security.

Co-sleeping can inadvertently reinforce certain behaviors, and for dogs with anxiety, the close proximity to their owners might exacerbate rather than alleviate their distress. Crate training, when approached with positive reinforcement and patience, can provide these dogs with a designated space where they feel secure, reducing anxiety and promoting better overall mental well-being.

As you can see the decision to allow your dog into your bed is a multifaceted one. Puppies, with their boundless energy and need for structure, may benefit from a separate sleeping space to foster independence and prevent separation anxiety. Similarly, dogs with anxiety or separation anxiety issues may find solace in a well-designed crate, offering them a retreat that aids in managing their emotional challenges. As responsible pet parents, it is our duty to recognize and address the unique needs of our pups, ensuring that the sleeping arrangement contributes positively to their overall well-being.

In the grand scheme of things the choice to sleep with your dog is deeply personal and dependent on various factors, including lifestyle, preferences, and the needs of both the owner and the dog. Whether you decide to snuggle up with your dog or designate separate sleeping spaces, the key is to prioritize the well-being of both human and canine sleep partners. In the ever-evolving debate of sleeping with your dog, acknowledging the uniqueness of your case and the above mentioned factors is key to create and foster a harmonious coexistence, both day and night.

© Gabriel Riesco, Pawmos Dog Training LLC |   All Rights Reserved December 2023

Labradoodle Breed

Labradoodle Breed

Labradoodles are one of the most common breeds for families and for good reason.  A Labradoodle is a crossbreed between a Labrador Retriever and a Poodle. This mixed breed dog is known for its intelligence, playful personality, and affectionate nature. They can also be high energy type of dogs , so both obedience training and behavior training is highly recommended since most of these dogs are first choice for families with kids. 

Labradoodles are also known for being low-shedding and hypoallergenic, making them a popular choice for people with allergies. 

Because Labradoodles are a relatively new breed, there is some variation in their appearance and temperament. Some Labradoodles may have more characteristics of a Labrador Retriever, while others may take after the Poodle more.

One of the most appealing aspects of the Labradoodle breed is their intelligence. Both Labradors and Poodles are known for their smarts, and Labradoodles inherit this trait from their parents. This makes them easy to train and a great choice for families with children.

In addition to their intelligence, Labradoodles are also known for their playful and affectionate nature. They are happy-go-lucky dogs that love to be around people and are known for their friendly demeanor. Having said that any dog breed can develop behavioral issues, so don’t take it for granted that your labradoodle does not require any training. They can also be a handful.  

When it comes to grooming, Labradoodles may require regular brushing and haircuts to keep their coat looking its best. They are low-shedding and hypoallergenic, but they may still require regular grooming to maintain their coat and prevent matting.

Overall, Labradoodles are a wonderful breed that make great companions for families with children. They are intelligent, playful, and affectionate, and their low-shedding and hypoallergenic coats make them a great choice for people with allergies.

  © Gabriel Riesco, Pawmos Dog Training LLC |   All Rights Reserved September 2023

     

     

    7 Most Rare Dog Beeds

    7 Most Rare Dog Beeds

    If you are into interesting and rare breeds here are 7 of the most rare breeds. I did some research about their traits. Let us know if you have one of these breeds and can share some of their traits!

    1.Azawakh 

    2.Bergamasco Sheepdog 

    3.Cirneco dell’Etna

    4.Dandie Dinmont 

    5.Lagotto Romagnolo

    6.Peruvian Inca Orchid

    7.Carea

    1.Azawakh: 

    The Azawakh is a unique and elegant breed of dog that originates from the Sahara desert region of West Africa. This breed is known for its slender and athletic build, as well as its striking coloring, which can range from sandy to reddish-brown, with white markings on the chest and legs.

    Despite their slender appearance, Azawakhs are incredibly agile and athletic, and are able to run at great speeds for long periods of time. They were originally bred to hunt and guard livestock, and are known for their independent and protective nature.

    Azawakhs are intelligent and loyal dogs, and form strong bonds with their owners. They can be reserved and aloof with strangers, but are very loving and affectionate with their families. They are also highly trainable, and can excel in obedience, agility, and other dog sports.

    One of the unique aspects of the Azawakh breed is their relatively short coat, which requires minimal grooming. They do shed, but not to the same extent as many other breeds. They are also relatively low maintenance in terms of exercise, and can be happy with a moderate amount of daily activity.

    Overall, the Azawakh is a beautiful and intelligent breed that makes a loyal and protective companion for the right owner. If you are considering adding an Azawakh to your family, be sure to research the breed thoroughly and consult with a reputable breeder to ensure that you are getting a healthy and well-socialized puppy

    2.Bergamasco Sheepdogs

    The Bergamasco Sheepdogs are intelligent and easy to train, making them a great breed for families with children. They are also known for their loyalty and affectionate nature, and they are generally good with other dogs and pets. However, like all dogs, they need to be socialized from a young age to prevent them from becoming aggressive or anxious around other animals.

    In terms of exercise and activity, Bergamasco Sheepdogs are a relatively active breed. They enjoy going for long walks and playing in open spaces, but they are also content to spend time at home with their family. Because of their thick coats, they do not do well in hot or humid climates, and they should be kept indoors during the hottest parts of the day.

    Overall, the Bergamasco Sheepdog is a unique and intelligent breed that makes a great companion for families and individuals alike. With their thick, matted coats and gentle dispositions, these dogs are a sight to behold

    3.The Cirneco dell’Etna:

    The Cirneco dell’Etna is a small, sleek and athletic breed of dog that originates from the island of Sicily in Italy. They are part of the Hound group, and are known for their keen hunting abilities and keen sense of smell. They are thought to be descendants of the ancient Egyptian hunting dogs, and were traditionally used to hunt small game and rabbits on the rugged terrain of Mount Etna.

    Despite their small size, the Cirneco dell’Etna is a strong and hardy breed that is well-suited to life in harsh environments. They are known for their stamina and endurance, and are capable of running for long distances without tiring. They have a distinctive appearance, with a lean and muscular body, long and slender legs, and a pointed, triangular-shaped head. They have a short, fine coat that is typically red, orange, or chestnut in color, with white markings on the chest and paws.

    The Cirneco dell’Etna is an intelligent and independent breed, and they can be somewhat difficult to train. They have a strong prey drive and can be prone to chasing small animals, so they need to be kept on a leash or in a secure area when not in training. They are generally gentle and affectionate with their families, but can be reserved and aloof with strangers.

    Despite their long history and unique abilities, the Cirneco dell’Etna is not a well-known breed outside of their native Sicily. They are recognized by the American Kennel Club and the United Kennel Club, but are still considered to be a rare breed in the United States. If you are interested in owning a Cirneco dell’Etna, it is important to do your research and find a reputable breeder who can provide you with a healthy and well-socialized puppy.

    4.Dandie Dinmont Terrier 

    The Dandie Dinmont Terrier is a small to medium-sized dog breed that originated in the border region between England and Scotland. They are known for their long, low-slung bodies and distinctive “topknot” of hair on their heads.

    Dandie Dinmonts are intelligent, independent, and can be a bit stubborn at times. They are loyal and affectionate with their families, but can be reserved with strangers. They are highly adaptable and can live in a variety of environments, but do best in homes with a secure, fenced yard where they can play and run.

    One of the most striking things about Dandie Dinmonts is their appearance. They have long, soft hair that is typically two-tone in color, with a dark “pepper” color on the back and lighter “mustard” on the face, legs, and belly. Their bodies are long and low-slung, and they have short legs that give them a distinctive, low-to-the-ground appearance.

    Despite their small size, Dandie Dinmonts were originally bred for hunting, and they have a strong prey drive. They are known for their courage and tenacity, and are capable of tackling larger prey than their size would suggest. They excel at tracking and hunting small game, such as rats and rabbits, and are often used as earthdogs in underground quarry work.

    In addition to their hunting abilities, Dandie Dinmonts are also intelligent and trainable. They can excel in obedience and agility competitions, and make great therapy dogs. They are sensitive and responsive to their owners, and can be easily trained using positive reinforcement and rewards-based methods.

    Overall, the Dandie Dinmont Terrier is a unique and endearing breed that is known for its intelligence, adaptability, and tenacious spirit. While they may be a bit stubborn at times, they are loving and loyal companions that make great pets for families and individuals alike

    5.Peruvian Inca Orchid :

    The Peruvian Inca Orchid, also known as the Peruvian Hairless Dog, is a unique and ancient breed of dog native to Peru. This breed is known for its lack of fur, which is caused by a genetic mutation that occurred thousands of years ago. Despite their lack of hair, Peruvian Inca Orchids are not completely hairless; they often have a few patches of hair on their head, tail, and paws.

    Peruvian Inca Orchids are thought to have been bred by the ancient Inca civilization, who valued them for their warmth and companionship. They were often kept as pets by royalty and were considered a symbol of wealth and status.

    In modern times, Peruvian Inca Orchids are prized for their intelligence, loyalty, and affectionate nature. They are also known for their endurance and are often used in agility and endurance competitions.

    Despite their ancient origins and unique appearance, Peruvian Inca Orchids are not well-known outside of Peru. However, they are gaining popularity among dog lovers who appreciate their unique qualities and are looking for a companion that is both affectionate and intelligent.

    Overall, the Peruvian Inca Orchid is a fascinating and unique breed of dog with a rich history and a loyal and loving personality. If you’re considering adding one to your family, be sure to do your research and choose a reputable breeder to ensure that you get a healthy and well-adjusted pup.

    6.Lagotto Romagnolo: 

    The Lagotto Romagnolo is a small to medium-sized breed of dog that originates from the Romagna region of Italy. They are known for their thick, curly coats and their keen sense of smell. The breed is highly intelligent and eager to please, making them great companions and easy to train.

    One of the unique characteristics of the Lagotto Romagnolo is their water-resistant coat, which is thick and curly and helps to protect them from the elements. This makes them an excellent choice for activities such as hunting and water sports.

    The Lagotto Romagnolo is a versatile breed that is well-suited to a variety of activities, including agility, obedience, and search and rescue. They are also great family pets and are known for their friendly, outgoing personalities.

    Despite their friendly nature, Lagotto Romagnolos can be reserved with strangers and may need proper socialization to feel comfortable around new people. They are also highly energetic and require regular exercise and mental stimulation to stay happy and healthy.

    Overall, the Lagotto Romagnolo is a loving and loyal breed that makes a great companion for active families and individuals. With their intelligence and eagerness to please, they are easy to train and adapt well to a variety of living situations.

    7.Carea Breed: 

    Carea is a rare and ancient breed of dog that originated in the Basque region of Spain. They are known for their intelligence, loyalty, and athleticism, and are prized as both working dogs and companion animals.

    The Carea is a large breed, with males standing between 24 and 29 inches tall at the shoulder and weighing between 60 and 80 pounds. They have a muscular, athletic build and a thick, waterproof coat that comes in a variety of colors, including black, brown, red, and fawn.

    One of the most striking features of the Carea is their head, which is large and square-shaped, with a distinctive ridge of fur running down the center of their forehead. They have triangular ears that stand erect, and their eyes are dark and intelligent.

    The Carea is an intelligent and trainable breed, and they are often used as working dogs for tasks such as herding and guarding livestock. They are also very athletic, and excel in activities such as agility and flyball. In addition to their physical abilities, Careas are also known for their loyalty and devotion to their owners, making them excellent companion animals.

    Despite their many positive qualities, Careas are not a well-known breed outside of their native Spain. They are still quite rare, and can be difficult to find outside of their home country. However, for those who are able to find and own a Carea, they are a highly rewarding and loyal companion

       © Gabriel Riesco, Pawmos Dog Training LLC |   All Rights Reserved August 2023