Why Dogs Sniff Each Other’s Butts?

Why Dogs Sniff Each Other’s Butts?

Dogs are known for their curious and playful nature. They love to explore and interact with the world around them, including other dogs. One of the most common ways that dogs interact with each other is by sniffing each other’s butts. This behavior may seem strange to humans, but it is actually a crucial part of canine communication.

So, why do dogs sniff each other’s butts? 

To understand this behavior, it is important to know that dogs have a highly developed sense of smell. Their noses are much more sensitive than ours, and they use their sense of smell to gather information about the world around them. This includes gathering information about other dogs.

  • When dogs sniff each other’s butts, they are essentially gathering information about their fellow canine. The area around a dog’s butt is rich in scent glands, and the odors produced by these glands contain a wealth of information about the dog. For example, the scent can tell a dog about the other dog’s age, sex, health, and even what it has been eating.
  • Another reason dogs sniff each other’s butts is to socialize. It is a way for dogs to say hello and get to know each other. Dogs are social animals, and sniffing is a way for them to gather information and build relationships. They bond and establish trust with each other. 
  • Sometimes the manner in which dogs sniff rear ends can establish which of the two dogs is dominant and set the foundation of a canine relationshipThe dog that is sniffed first is usually considered to be the lower-ranking dog, while the dog that does the sniffing is the higher-ranking dog. 
  • Sniffing also helps the dog know when others are ready to mate or helps puppies locate their mother when they’re ready to eat.

Is intense smelling a sign of aggression?

There’s been some reports where a correlation between intense smelling and aggression has been noticed. In my experience the smelling part is never the issue, but the intensity can cause  problems. If your dog is smelling to intense and too pushy I advice you to work on slowing down your dog before interacting with a new dog or group of dogs. Dogs who interact too intense can create a lot of tension when socializing.  

Why do dogs smell another dog’s poop?

Dogs possess very powerful olfactory senses that can decode a lot of information. For dogs, poop is not gross, is just a source of very useful data  Dogs sniff poop to gather information about health conditions, diet, distress, home environment, and even another dog’s mood. The main aim of smelling poop is to gather information and learn more about the dog.

Sniffing each other’s butts is a natural behavior for dogs. It is a way for them to communicate, establish hierarchy status and bond with each other. So, next time you see your dog sniffing another dog’s butt, let them be. Your furry friend is simply engaging in a behavior that is a crucial part of dog communication.

     © Gabriel Riesco, Pawmos Dog Training LLC |   All Rights Reserved April 2023

Alpha Dominance Theories. Myth? Or Science?

Alpha Dominance Theories. Myth? Or Science?

Dominance in animals is a concept that describes a relationship between two individuals or groups, where one individual or group is able to exert control or influence over the other. This control can manifest in a number of ways, such as access to resources, mating opportunities, or social status.

The scientific consensus on dominance in animals is that it is a complex phenomenon that can be influenced by a variety of factors, including physical size, age, sex, and social experience. Dominance relationships can also vary depending on the specific species and social structure of the animal group in question.

In many animal groups, dominance is established through aggressive interactions, such as fighting or displays of strength. However, in some cases, dominance can also be established through more subtle behaviors, such as posturing, vocalizations, or even changes in body posture or facial expressions.

Is Dominance important and relevant in dogs?

The more you can understand dog’s true animal nature, the better decisions and care you will be able to provide to your dog or dogs. Dominance and dominance hierarchies is something to consider when dealing with dog’s behavior. A good diagnosis is always a must in order to achieve a good outcome. 

The problem is that dominance can be easily misinterpreted and misapplied by dog owners and trainers. There are two different tendencies or trends that can lead to bad outcomes:

  • 1. The Alpha Theories. This theory has the tendency to think that most behavioral problems are caused because of dominance issues and solved by reestablising dominance hierarchies. This is specially true with aggressive dogs. Most aggression issues that I’ve worked on are not because of dominance status. Some of them are, but there are a wide variety of reasons for aggression. Ex: fear, specific triggers, frustration, restrainers such as a leash or a fence, negative associations , etc. Assuming that all or most issues are related to dominance is misleading and potentially dangerous. 

 

  • 2. The Deniers. This new trend has the tendency to deny that dominance issues do exist. They tend to avoid addressing dominance hierarchies as part of dog’s social interactions with both dogs and humans. Denying this and not addressing it when it is an issue it’s not helpful and can get you stuck in a never-ending loop of behavioral problems. 

 

Why is it so controversial with dogs and appears to be no consensus?

There’s been a crusade to prevent animals from being abused in the name of dominance. While this crusade is based on a noble cause which I applaud and support, on it’s way had somehow distorted the concept of dominance and in some cases even tried to ban the use of the word “Dominance”. 

This dogmatic approach is not science, although some supporters claim to be science-based. Let’s be clear, denying the existence of dominance and hierarchies in the animal kingdom it’s simply wrong.

 Scientific consensus says that most organisms organize themselves into hierarchies. It is also known that the fundamental biological mechanism for the regulation of hierarchy is serotonin. This is not disputable. Hierarchies are not a construct, they are observed in nature and they are 350 million years old.

How dominance affect dog’s interactions?

It is important to note that dominance in animals does not necessarily imply cruelty or oppression. Rather, it is a natural part of many animal social structures, and can help to maintain stability and order within the group. Additionally, dominance relationships can often be fluid and change over time, as individuals gain or lose social status or as the group dynamic evolves.

Disagreements still occur among dogs that have formed healthy relationships with each other. Some dogs can display socially inappropriate behavior and will challenge the stability and order within the group. 

While dominance hierarchies in dogs can be a natural part of their social behavior, it’s important for dog owners to be aware of the potential consequences of these hierarchies. In some cases, dominant dogs may become aggressive towards other dogs or humans, leading to fights and injuries. Additionally, dogs that are constantly subjected to dominance behaviors may become anxious or stressed, which can have negative effects on their overall health and well-being.

Should I assert dominance to my dog with alfa rolls?

The short answer is NO. During my first year of training dogs over a decade ago, I practiced successfully alfa rolls a few times. I soon stopped doing it. There are several problems with this:

  • 1. Alfa rolls do not solve the underlying behaviors and emotional responses of your dog in the long term in most cases.

 

  • 2. It’s not easy to do. WHY? Because submission doesn’t come from asserting physical force. Submission is an offered behavior from the surrendering individual, not one that’s purely enforced. I did 14 years of Judo and Jujitsu so I know very well how to apply this techniques. I’ve experienced both ends. Most people don’t know how to do this. If you’re using pure force, you are doing it wrong and you will never achieve submission. Most probably you’ll get bitten or you will shut down your dog into a fear loop. 

 

  • 3. There are many other ways where you can set rules and boundaries through Body language, controlled games and routines without confrontation, physical force or intimidation.

 

  • 4. By doing alfa rolls you’re risking doing it wrong, doing it for the wrong reasons, doing it to the wrong dog and getting bitten or installing fear in your dog in many cases. Not only you will have not solve anything, but you would have make it worse 

 

  • 5. It is not a pleasant experience for neither the human or the dog.

There are many different ways to set up rules and boundaries to your dog without asserting dominance or being confrontational. Having said that rules and boundaries are absolutely necessary. 

In conclusion, dominance is a common trait observed in many animal species and refers to the hierarchical ranking of individuals within a social group. While dominance hierarchies are often associated with aggression and conflict, they can also have positive effects on social cohesion within a group. Dominance is a complex concept that It is important to understand and should not be treated lightly when conflict arises. If you think your dog or dogs are struggling with dominance issues I would highly suggest to ask for help from an experienced specialized trainer in this issues. A basic obedience class is not going to get you very far and an inexperienced handler or trainer can make things worse.  

 

© Gabriel Riesco, Pawmos Dog Training LLC |   All Rights Reserved December 2022

How NOT To Enter A Dog Park With Your Dog 

How NOT To Enter A Dog Park With Your Dog 

Are Dog Parks Ok?

Dog parks or runs can be very beneficial for your dog if you know what you are doing. If you want to read more about dog parks click this link to learn more about it: Are Dog Parks A Good Idea?

 I’ve heard numerous well known trainers talking badly about parks and not recommending going any near them. This is usually because they are not specialized in Family Dog Training. They are usually specialized in agility, high obedience training, dog sports or working dogs.

How NOT to enter a dog park?

More often than not, well intentioned dog parents and dog trainers enter the park by asking their dog to sit, then wait and 10 seconds later they release their dog. Some more advanced obedience dogs they do this even without the leash. Wether you do this on leash or off leash is not relevant.

So what’s wrong with this? Isn’t this advanced obedience training?

Yes, but this is the wrong place to do this. Why? Because when you do obedience training you’re penting up your dog’s drive with a “command” or “cue” and your dog is waiting for a release. By the time you release, all that pent up energy and anticipation is like a balloon under water. So you are basically sending a torpedo to the park. Which means that your dog is most likely in the wrong state of mind. In other words your dog is on high excitement, high-arousal, high-drive mode, high dopamine etc. This mindset might work very well for performance and obedience. The problem is that at this sate they can miss a lot of social cues from other dogs and people. They also loose awareness of their environment, since they are mainly focused on a task or on you. Your obedience training can actually make it worse.

 If you are a very good trainer, your dog might listen to you, but at some point your dog is either going to get into trouble or attract trouble. And this is why Dog Trainers hate parks, because obedience doesn’t work well in parks. What works is a controlled state of mind on your dog where your dog slowly develops great dog social skills.

An even worse way to enter a dog park is restraining your dog on a leash, while your dog is pulling like a maniac and then unclipping the leash. If obedience (cue and release) is sending a torpedo, doing this is sending a nuclear missile. It’s most likely not going to end up well. 

So how do you enter a Dog Park?

The best way to enter a dog park is by calming your dog down.  Your dog should be with no tension on the leash and in a calm state of mind. This doesn’t mean your dog cannot run or play with other dogs. What this means is that your dog is in a state of mind where he or she can pick up on dog social cues and adjust to every dog. 

The more they practice self control and awareness, they better coping skills they get. This has to do with behavioral dog training not with obedience or advanced obedience training. Family dog training is 90% of the time behavioral training (state of mind), while obedience or advanced training is Classical or Operant Conditioning Training which is based on consequence (reward or punishment)

 Best well behaved dogs I’ve met are not from dog trainers, They are from dog owners that tap into this intuitively. They are not highly trained dogs that attract attention on instagram. They are well behaved happy dogs that no one notices or cares because they are just doing their thing. You will find most of this dogs in dog parks not on instagram accounts. 

© Gabriel Riesco, Pawmos Dog Training LLC |   All Rights Reserved January 2023